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Medium Baking Four Seasons Spring Oolong

Medium Baking Four Seasons Spring Oolong

Special Reserve Oolong Tea

$40.00
100g

Free domestic shipping on orders over $29

Description

Origin:Nantou, Taiwan
Cultivar:Si Ji Chun "Four Seasons Spring"
Elevation: 500 - 850m
Harvest: April 11, 2020

This tea is crafted from the Si Ji Chun, or "Four Seasons Spring" cultivar. You may be more familiar with our standard Qing Xiang or "Clear Fragrance" flowery aroma tea of this cultivar, which we market simply as "Four Seasons Spring." This micro-lot of Four Seasons is the same floral tea from our usual farm group, but this lot undergoes an artistic baking regimen that takes several weeks to complete. Some ball-rolled oolong teas such as Tie Guanyin (Iron Goddess of Mercy) are traditionally baked to bring out a "caramelized" sweetness from the Maillard reaction--the same transformation that occurs in baking bread, roasting a sweet potato or roasting coffee. Oolong tea artisans produce baked teas that range from blonde-light roasts to medium and deeper dark roasts. This tea is medium baked, producing a golden infusion color and notes of fresh roasted coconuts, sugarcane juice and floral nectar. Be sure to quickly rinse the tea to warm up the tea leaves and smooth out the flavor before commencing your Gongfu Cha brewing series of multiple infusions.


Origin

Nantou, Taiwan

Tasting Notes

fresh roasted coconuts, sugarcane juice and floral nectar

Ingredients

Oolong tea.

Traditional Preparation

Gaiwan Brewing Guidelines:

Add 7g tea leaves per 150ml of water to a Gaiwan
Water Temperature: 200°F
Rinse 5 seconds.
Infuse for 30-45 seconds and decant.
Repeat for another 3-5 infusion

Gaiwan Brewing from Rishi Tea on YouTube.



We encourage you to experiment with the quantity of tealeaves and the length of the infusion time to find your desired brew strength. Varying the water temperature isn't recommended, as water that is too hot will over-extract the bitter components of tea, while water that is too cool might not fully draw out the aromas and flavors of tea.
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